Personal. Idiosyncratic. Individual. Separate. Different. Unique. Singular. Distinct. You.

Yes, you. Nobody else is like you. Many are similar, but only you are... you. That means that when you learn, you do it differently to everyone else. If you are a student you may be sat in the same classroom or lecture hall as many other students, and listening to the same content, but you interpret it differently to everyone else. You have a unique experience, peculiar to you. You have your own preferences, approaches and strategies. It follows that the tools and technologies you use for learning are those you have selected to use because you are (or should be) comfortable with them, personally. These tools, services and technologies become a part of your personal learning environment or PLE.

I greatly enjoyed attending the Future of Technology in Education (FOTE) conference at London University's Senate Building last week. It was an exciting and thought provoking, well attended event which somehow resembled a TED talk, with its large stage, bright studio lighting, music and arena style seating. It was also great to catch up with so many old friends and to meet some new ones.

This is number 33 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I'm providing a brief overview of the theories, and how each can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My last post explored the work of Allan Paivio and his theory of dual coding.
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This is number 32 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I'm providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My last post explored  the work of Seymour Papert and his theory of learning by making, also known as constructionism.
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This is number 30 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My most recent post examined Stanley Milgram's experiments on obedience to authority and their application in education.

In this post, I explore Donald Norman's ideas around the design of every day objects.

This is number 27 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. The previous post featured Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs. In this post, I will examine Jack Merizow's Transformative Learning theory.
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This is number 26 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. The previous post highlighted issues around the theory of Communities of Practice, from the work of Jean Lave and Etienne Wenger. In this post, I'm revisiting a well known and heavily used motivational theory - Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs.
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