David Warlick once said ' for the first time we are preparing young people for a future we cannot clearly describe.' In a fast changing world where everything technology touches grows exponentially, we really are in serious trouble if we cannot prepare children for uncertainty. And yet that is exactly what many school curricula are failing to do. Change is accelerating and uncertainty is ... well.... a certainty. Many of the jobs children will take when they leave school in ten years or so haven't even been conceived yet. What are we teaching them now, and will it be adequate to prepare them for this kind of uncertainty?

This entire week for me seems to have revolved around assessment.

Personal. Idiosyncratic. Individual. Separate. Different. Unique. Singular. Distinct. You.

Yes, you. Nobody else is like you. Many are similar, but only you are... you. That means that when you learn, you do it differently to everyone else. If you are a student you may be sat in the same classroom or lecture hall as many other students, and listening to the same content, but you interpret it differently to everyone else. You have a unique experience, peculiar to you.

I greatly enjoyed attending the Future of Technology in Education (FOTE) conference at London University's Senate Building last week. It was an exciting and thought provoking, well attended event which somehow resembled a TED talk, with its large stage, bright studio lighting, music and arena style seating. It was also great to catch up with so many old friends and to meet some new ones.

This is number 33 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I'm providing a brief overview of the theories, and how each can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My last post explored the work of Allan Paivio and his theory of dual coding.
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This is number 32 in my series on learning theories. Psychologists and cognitive scientists have offered a number of useful theories that aid our understanding of learning. In this series I'm providing a brief overview of each theory, and how each can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My last post explored  the work of Seymour Papert and his theory of learning by making, also known as constructionism.
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This is number 30 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. My most recent post examined Stanley Milgram's experiments on obedience to authority and their application in education.

In this post, I explore Donald Norman's ideas around the design of every day objects.

This is number 27 in my series on learning theories. I'm working through the alphabet of psychologists and theorists, providing a brief overview of each theory, and how it can be applied in education. Previous posts in this series are all linked below. The previous post featured Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Human Needs. In this post, I will examine Jack Merizow's Transformative Learning theory.
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